ABCT::CONVENTION 2011 TORONTO ABCT Home
Convention 2011
Workshops Ticketed Sessions
Workshops
ABCT's workshops provide participants with up-to-date integration of theoretical, empirical, and clinical knowledge about specific issues or themes. Participants in these courses can earn 3 hours of continuing education credits per workshop.
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Friday, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Workshop 1

Working with Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents: Clinical Presentation, Assessment Strategies, and Treatment

Eric Youngstrom, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Melissa Jenkins, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Friday, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Workshop 2

Enhancing Treatment Outcomes in Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder

Shireen Rizvi, Rutgers University

Advanced level of familiarity with the material

Friday, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Workshop 3

Designing Contingency Management Interventions for Health Behaviors

Jeremiah Weinstock, St. Louis University

Carla Rash, University of Connecticut Health Center

Friday, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Workshop 4

Brief Management of Suicide Risk

Craig Bryan, University of Texas Health Science Center

Basic level of familiarity with the material

Friday, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Workshop 5

An Integrated CBT Approach for Anxiety and Depression Co-morbidity

Neil Rector, University of Toronto

John Riskind, George Mason University

Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Friday, 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Workshop 6

Modern Cognitive Behavior Therapy

Stefan Hofmann, Boston University

Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Friday, 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Workshop 7

Assessment and Treatment of Late-Life Depression

Dimitris Kiosses, Weill-Cornell Institute of Geriatric Psychiatry

Jo Anne Sirey, Weill-Cornell Institute of Geriatric Psychiatry

Victoria Wilkins, Weill-Cornell Institute of Geriatric Psychiatry

Basic level of familiarity with the material

Friday, 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Workshop 8

Treating Narcissistic Personality Disorder: The Patient That We Like to Dislike

Arthur Freeman, Midwestern University

Moderate to Advanced level of familiarity with the material

Friday, 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Workshop 9

Civil Commitment: Ethical Breach or Prudent Care?

Wayne Bowers, University of Iowa

Arnold Anderson, University of Iowa

Janeta Tansey, University of Iowa

Basic level of familiarity with the material

Friday, 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Workshop 10

Facilitating the Development of Emotion Regulation Skills for Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Focusing on Therapy Readiness and CBT Interventions

Shana Nichols, ASPIRE Center for Learning and Development

Samara Tetenbaum, ASPIRE Center for Learning and Development

Basic level of familiarity with the material

Saturday, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Workshop 11

Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Adolescents: Techniques and Implementation

Laura Mufson, Columbia University

Jami Young, Rutgers University

Basic level of familiarity with the material

Saturday, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Workshop 12

Acceptance and Change in Couple Therapy: Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy

Andrew Christensen, UCLA

Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Saturday, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Workshop 13

Psychotherapy for the Interrupted Life: An Evidence-Based Treatment for Adult Survivors of Childhood Abuse

Tamar Gordon, New York University

Christie Jackson, New York University

Susan Trachtenberg Paula, Martha K. Selig Institute

Marylene Cloitre, New York University

Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Saturday, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Workshop 14

Silence to Sound: Understanding and Implementing a Treatment Approach for Selective Mutism

Sandra Mendlowitz, University of Toronto

Suneeta Monga, University of Toronto

Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Saturday, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Workshop 15

Empirically based CBT Supervision: Making Supervision More Effective

Robert Reiser, Palo Alto University

Donna Sudak, Drexel University

Derek Milne, Newcastle University

Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Saturday, 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Workshop 16

Exposure Therapy for Anxiety: Basics and Beyond

Jonathan Abramowitz, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Brett Deacon, University of Wyoming

Stephen Whiteside, Mayo Clinic

Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Saturday, 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Workshop 17

Regulation of Cues for Childhood Overeating: The Regulation Of Cues Intervention

Kerry Boutelle, University of California, San Diego

Basic level of familiarity with the material

Self-control-the ability to inhibit competing urges, behaviours, or desires-is highly valued by societies. The frequent dramatic consequences accompanying poor self-control easily capture the lime-light and are hard to ignore. However, too much self-control can be equally problematic. Though less eye-catching, emotional over-control (a form of self-control) has begun to be recognized as an important factor associated with social isolation, poor interpersonal functioning, and the development of severe and difficult-to-treat mental health problems (e.g., anorexia nervosa, chronic depression). Due to the high value placed on regulation of potentially destructive emotions or impulses, not surprisingly, problems associated with over-control have received little attention or been misunderstood-making recognition difficult. The focus of this workshop will be on this understudied problem-i.e., emotional over-control (EOC). Research has shown high rates of EOC personality disorders to be common among those with depression and these individuals are precisely those less likely to respond to evidence-based depression treatments. Based on 16 years of research, findings from three pilot trials of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) for treatment-resistant depression (TRD) and a current multi-centre trial in the UK-new approaches for treating EOC and chronic depression, including rigidity, interpersonal aloofness, emotion inhibition, and perfectionism will be reviewed using role play and videotape case illustrations. A novel biosocial theory will be presented positing that heightened threat sensitivity and diminished reward sensitivity transact with early family experiences emphasizing "mistakes as intolerable" and "self-control as imperative" results in an emotionally over-controlled coping style that limits opportunities to learn new skills and exploit positive social reinforcers.

Saturday, 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Workshop 18

New Thinking in Treatment Resistant Depression: Targeting Emotional Over-Control

Thomas. R. Lynch, University of Southampton, UK

Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Saturday, 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Workshop 19

Paradigms for Disseminating Contextual Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Strategies

Patricia Robinson, Mountainview Consulting Group, Inc.

Moderate to Advanced level of familiarity with the material

Saturday, 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Workshop 20

Introduction to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia

Michael Perlis, University of Pennsylvania

Donn Posner, Brown University

Robert Meyers, St. John's University

Basic level of familiarity with the material

Saturday, 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Workshop 21

Difficult to Treat? Not Anymore! Cognitive Therapy for OCD

Adam Radomsky, Concordia University

Moderate level of familiarity with the material

 

 
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