Advanced Methodology and Statistics Seminars (AMASS)

Designed to enhance researchers’ abilities, there are generally two seminars offered on Thursday or during the course of the convention. They are 4 hours long and limited to 40 attendees. Participants in these courses can earn 4 continuing education credits per seminar.

 

Thursday, November 17 | 8:30 AM – 12:30 PM

#1: An Introduction to Qualitative Research

 

Thursday, November 17 | 8:30 AM – 12:30 PM

Presented by:
Anna C. Revette, Ph.D., Senior Research Scientist, Survey and Qualitative Methods Core, Division of Population Sciences, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Instructor, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Participants earn 4 continuing education credits

Anna Revette is a sociologist with extensive experience in developing, conducting, and analyzing qualitative and mixed methods research. She is highly experienced in traditional and novel approaches to qualitative data collection and analysis, incorporating the critical voices of patients and caregivers into our understanding of health and medicine. She earned her MA and PhD in Sociology from Northeastern University and currently works as a Qualitative Research Scientist for the Survey and Qualitative Methods Core at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and is an Instructor at the Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health

Long-term Goal: This training session will enable participants to understand and appreciated the need for qualitative inquiry and the unique ways it can further our understanding of the lived experience of health and medicine.

Abstract: This session introduces participants to qualitative research and helps them understand the underlying assumptions of a qualitative approach while also providing practical considerations for conducting qualitative research. Participants will learn about the qualitative research process and the main methodological approaches of qualitative research. Participants will be introduced to iterative and reflexive nature of qualitative research and emphasis will be placed on the production of quality and trustworthy research through a systematic approach to qualitative data collection and analysis. We will examine meaningful ways to present and disseminate qualitative findings and how to describe the analysis process to various audiences, including funding sources. This session will have a primary focus on interviews as a data collection method and introduce participants to thematic analysis supported by  qualitative software program. Examples related to mental health/psychology will be incorporated into the training, and participants will be encouraged to bring questions and examples from their own research into the discussions.

At the end of this session, the learner will be able to:

1) Discuss theoretical underpinnings, principles, and procedures of qualitative research.
2) Define the association between their research questions and the appropriate qualitative approach and data collection method.
3) List qualitative software programs and their application in coding and analysis of qualitative data.
4) Critically appraise qualitative research.
5) Recite diverse strategies for sharing qualitative research results with a range of audiences.

Session Outline

  • Introduce participants to qualitative research and help them understand the underlying assumptions of a qualitative approach while also providing practical considerations for conducting qualitative research
  • Explore the qualitative research process and the main methodological approaches of qualitative research, including the iterative and reflexive nature of qualitative research and the production of quality and trustworthy research through a systematic approach to qualitative data collection and analysis
  • Examine meaningful ways to present and disseminate qualitative findings and how to describe the analysis process to various audiences
  • Examples related to mental health/psychology will be incorporated into the training, and participants will be encouraged to bring questions and examples from their own research into the discussions.

 

Recommended Readings:

Braun, V., & Clarke, V. (2013). Successful qualitative research: A practical guide for beginners. sage.

Pope, C., Ziebland, S., & Mays, N. (2000). Analysing qualitative data. Bmj320(7227), 114-116.

Ramanadhan, S., Revette, A. C., Lee, R. M., & Aveling, E. L. (2021). Pragmatic approaches to analyzing qualitative data for implementation science: an introduction. Implementation Science Communications2(1), 1-10.

Creswell, J. W., & Poth, C. N. (2016). Qualitative inquiry and research design: Choosing among five approaches. Sage publications

Spates, K., Evans, N. T. M., Watts, B. C., Abubakar, N., & James, T. (2020). Keeping ourselves sane: A qualitative exploration of Black women’s coping strategies for gendered racism. Sex Roles82(9), 513-524.

Thursday, November 17 | 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

#2: Application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to quantify exposure to socio-environmental factors

 

Thursday, November 17 | 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Presented by:
Kevin M. Mwenda, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Population Studies, Brown University

Participants earn 4 continuing education credits

Dr. Kevin Mwenda is an Assistant Professor of Population Studies and Associate Director of Spatial Structures in the Social Sciences (S4) at Brown University. His research interests include designing and applying methods that explore, analyze and visualize spatial patterns within health data, to better understand human-environment dynamics (e.g. population health, climate and society), and the role humans play at the nexus among these. As S4 Associate Director, Dr. Mwenda’s responsibility includes scholarly program development to support and advancement of spatial research at Brown. Dr. Mwenda both serves as a Co-Principal Investigator and offers consulting services on a wide variety of spatial research projects and grant proposals. He coordinates and teaches an intensive two-week GIS Institute twice a year. Dr. Mwenda also teaches courses on GIS and spatial analysis methods to undergraduate and graduate students and supervises students from a range of disciplines in their spatially-oriented research.

Long-term Goal: Participants will be comfortable working with GIS to conduct basic spatial queries and analyses of geographical phenomena.

Abstract: Geographic information Systems (GIS) methods are increasingly used to investigate the effects of socio-environmental factors and exposure towards vulnerable populations. This workshop will introduce participants to concepts and methods in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) that will facilitate appropriate spatial queries to determine: 1) Containment and Accessibility factors – how many alcohol outlets in a city are within a pre-established distance from existing schools; 2) Proximity factors – average distance between alcohol outlets and schools. Using open-source GIS software such as QGIS, participants will learn how to source, map and analyze locations and densities of liquor stores and schools. In so doing, participants will investigate if there is a significantly high number of liquor stores in a certain city given its size and assess potential impact of the prevalence of liquor stores on alcohol (mis)use among adolescents in nearby schools. Such information may be useful to mental health professionals to advocate for improved policies to target appropriate prevention and intervention strategies.

At the end of this session, the learner will be able to:

  • List basic concepts and methods to conduct spatial queries in GIS.
  • Download open-source GIS software and source location data to perform spatial queries in a reproducible way.
  • Create buffers using pre-designated parameters around geographic locations.
  • Combine spatial criteria and visualize candidate sites within study area.
  • Assess potential impact of spatially-themed criteria that may be misaligned with the situation on-ground.

 

Session Outline

  • Participants will receive an introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and its research applications
  • Participants will do an in-session application of GIS to distances between alcohol outlets and schools
  • Participants will identify at least one area in their own program of research in which they can apply GIS

 

Recommended Readings:

Fliss, M. D., Cox, M. E., Wallace, J. W., Simon, M. C., Knuth, K. B., & Proescholdbell, S. (2021). Measuring and Mapping Alcohol Outlet Environment Density, Clusters, and Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Durham, North Carolina, 2017. Preventing Chronic Disease, 18. doi:ARTN 210127

10.5888/pcd18.210127

Martin-Turrero, I., Valiente, R., Molina-de la Fuente, I., Bilal, U., Lazo, M., & Sureda, X. (2022). Accessibility and availability of alcohol outlets around schools: An ecological study in the city of Madrid, Spain, according to socioeconomic area-level. Environmental Research, 204. doi:ARTN 112323

10.1016/j.envres.2021.112323

Sacks, J. J., Brewer, R. D., Mesnick, J., Holt, J. B., Zhang, X., Kanny, D., . . . Gruenewald, P. J. (2020). Measuring Alcohol Outlet Density: An Overview of Strategies for Public Health Practitioners. J Public Health Manag Pract, 26(5), 481-488. doi:10.1097/PHH.0000000000001023

Trapp, G. S. A., Knuiman, M., Hooper, P., & Foster, S. (2018). Proximity to Liquor Stores and Adolescent Alcohol Intake: A Prospective Study. Am J Prev Med, 54(6), 825-830. doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2018.01.043

Wieczorek, W. F., & Hanson, C. E. (1997). New modeling methods: geographic information systems and spatial analysis. Alcohol Health Res World, 21(4), 331-339.

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