Invited Panels

 

Friday, November 18 | 12:30 PM – 2:00 PM

#1: Psychological Science’s Role in Addressing Mental, Physical and Social Health Epidemics: A Call to Action

 

Friday, November 18 | 12:30 PM – 2:00 PM

Moderated by:
Rosaura Orengo-Aguayo, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Clinical Psychologist, Medical University of South Carolina

Panelists:

Melissa J. Brymer, Ph.D., Psy.D., Director of Terrorism and Disaster Programs, National Center for Child Traumatic Stress, University of California, Los Angeles

Rinad Sary Beidas, Ph.D., Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Eduardo A. Lugo-Hernandez, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Psychology Department University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus, Executive Director, Impacto Juventud GC Inc.

Celia B. Fisher, Ph.D., Director, Center for Ethics Education, Director, HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute, Director, Human Development and Social Justice Lab, Fordham University

Neetu Abad, Ph.D., Demand for Immunization Team Lead, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Lauren M. Weinstock, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Psychiatry & Human Behavior, Alpert Medical School of Brown University

 

 

Abstract: This year’s ABCT convention theme is: “Emergency & Disaster Preparedness and Response: Using Cognitive and Behavioral Science to Make an Impact.”  The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed incredible strengths and formidable weaknesses in our preparedness and response to a global health emergency. While many questioned how vaccines were brought to market seemingly quickly, it was years of basic science and theory development that provided the foundation for effective translation to practice.  Public discussions around changing behavior to end the COVID-19 pandemic were often not led by scientists with expertise in behavior change and consequently many efforts were not empirically based. Concurrently, additional emergencies were revealed, some of which were caused or exacerbated by COVID, others were longstanding but became more noticeable (e.g., police brutality, mass shootings, hate-based crimes, opiate addiction, youth suicide, increases in depression and anxiety, rise in disasters due to climate change).

This invited panel will bring together leading experts in different fields including: suicide, substance use, racism, trauma, gun and mass violence, climate change, disaster response, etc. to discuss the biggest challenges in attending to these epidemics and syndemics, with a special focus on what psychological science, specifically CBT, has to offer. Panelists will provide a brief overview of the state of the evidence in their particular field of study and the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, followed by open-ended questions from the moderator with the goal of generating thought provoking dialogue around how we can better use research, clinical practice, and public policy to tackle these mental, physical and social health epidemics and syndemics.

Long-term Goals:

  1. The COVID-19 pandemic has made visible and exacerbated pre-existing mental, social and physical health epidemics and syndemics including suicide, substance use, depression, anxiety, racism, trauma, mass violence, among others.
  2. The field of psychological science, and CBT in particular, are in a unique position to address these epidemics and syndemics through research, clinical practice and policy.

At the end of this session, the learner will be able to:

  • Describe the prevalence and impacts of the various mental, physical and social health epidemics and syndemics facing adults and youth in the US.
  • Describe how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted and/or exacerbated these already occurring epidemics/syndemics, specifically the impacts on BIPOC, LGBTQI+ and other historically marginalized populations.
  • List critical gaps and next steps in research, clinical practice and policy for one or more of these mental, physical and social health epidemics.

Session Outline

  1. Panelists will provide a brief overview of the state of the evidence in their particular field of study and the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic
  2. The moderator will pose key open-ended questions with the goal of generating thought provocking dialogue around how we can better use research, clinical practice, and public policy to address these mental, physical and social health epidemics and syndemics.

Recommended Readings:

Kessler, R.C. et al. (2022). Changes in prevalence of mental illness among US adults during compared with before the COVID-19 pandemic. Psychiatry Clinics of North America, 45 (1), P1-28. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psc.2021.11.013

Samji, H. et al. (2022). Review: Mental health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on children and youth- a systemic review. Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 27 (2), 173-189. doi:10.1111/camh.12501

Andrasik, M.P. et al. (2022). Awakening: The unveiling of historically unadressed social inequities during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. Infectious Disease Clinics of North America, 36 (2), 295-308. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.idc.2022.01.009

Saturday, November 19 | 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

#2: Open Science: The Future of Psychology

 

Friday, November 18 | 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

Moderated by:
Rosaura Orengo-Aguayo, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Clinical Psychologist, Medical University of South Carolina

Panelists:

Eric A. Youngstrom, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience and Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Acting Director of the Center for Excellence in Research and Treatment of Bipolar Disorder

Mitchell J. Prinstein, Ph.D., ABPP, Chief Science Officer, American Psychological Association, John Van Seters Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

John Young, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology & Licensed Clinical Psychologist, University of Mississippi

Eiko Fried, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Clinical Psychology, Leiden University

Jessica L. Schleider, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Stony Brook University

Kelee Pacion, M.A.,  Biological Sciences Librarian, Lewis Science Library, Princeton University

 

Abstract:

This year’s ABCT convention theme is: “Emergency & Disaster Preparedness and Response: Using Cognitive and Behavioral Science to Make an Impact.”  The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed incredible strengths and formidable weaknesses in our preparedness and response to a global health emergency. The rapid development of effective vaccines was in large part due the open collaboration and sharing of data amongst scientists across the globe. Nevertheless, our field’s scientific findings are still primarily published in academic journals that are not accessible to the general public. Futhermore, less than half of published psychological findings are successfully reproduced, illustrating the need for open access to data sets and sharing of research protocols and materials amongst research teams.  Although open access journals are on the rise, there still is a significant gap in how psychological science, tools, and information reaches the public in an open, digestible, and accessible manner. Furthermore, the siloed model of doing science hinders our ability to replicate findings, rigorously examine contradicting findings, answer complex questions, and have a broader and timely impact.

This invited panel will bring together leading researchers and experts in the field of psychological science (and beyond) who are engaging in Open Science efforts to “help give away psychological science.” The panelists will explain what Open Science is and its relevance to the field of psychology and CBT specifically. They will discuss topics such as who benefits from Open Science? How is Open Science currently being used in the field of psychology/CBT and why should we be paying attention? What technology, forums, tools, and infrastructure are currently being used to promote Open Science? What are the potential benefits, as well as unintended consequences of Open Science?  How can Open Science play a role in communicating the evidence for cognitive behavioral interventions to the public and policymakers to effect change? How can Open Science combat misinformation? And most importantly, what are some action steps towards “helping to give away psychological science”, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic and future disasters and emergencies.

Long-term Goals:

  1. Open Science refers to a set of practices that increase the transparency and accessibility of scientific data and research with the goal strengthening the quality, rigour and reach of science, as well as making science accessible to the general public.
  2. Open Science can play an important role in communicating the evidence for cognitive behavioral interventions to the public and policymakers to effect change.

 

At the end of this session, the learner will be able to:

  • Describe what is Open Science and its relevance to the field of psychology and CBT.
  • List specific ways in which Open Science is currently being utilized in the filed of psychology, including tools, technology, forums and infrastructure aiding its dissemination.
  • Describe concrete action steps towards “helping to give away psychological science.”
  •  

 

Session Outline

  1. Panelists will provide a brief overview of what is Open Science and its relevance to the field of psychology, and CBT specifically.
  2. The moderator will pose key open-ended questions with the goal of generating thought provocking dialogue around who benefits from Open Science? How is Open Science currently being used in the field of psychology/CBT and why should we be paying attention? What technology, forums, tools, and infrastructure are currently being used to promote Open Science? What are the potential benefits, as well as unintended consequences of Open Science? How can Open Science play a role in communicating the evidence for cognitive behavioral interventions to the public and policymakers to effect change? How can Open Science combat misinformation? And most importantly, what are some action steps towards “helping to give away psychological science”, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic and future disasters and emergencies.

 

Recommended Readings:

Crüwell, S., Doorn, J. van, Etz, A., Makel, M., Moshontz, H., Niebaum, J., … Schulte-Mecklenbeck, M. (2018). 8 Easy Steps to Open Science: An Annotated Reading List. PsyArXiv Preprintshttp://doi.org/10.31234/OSF.IO/CFZYX.

Foster, E.D. & Deardorff, A. (2017). Open Science Framework (OSF). Journal of the Medical Library Association, 105(2), 203–206. doi: 10.5195/jmla.2017.88. PMCID: PMC5370619.

Munafò, M. R., Nosek, B. A., Bishop, D. V., Button, K. S., Chambers, C. D., Du Sert, N. P., … & Ioannidis, J. P. (2017). A manifesto for reproducible science. Nature Human Behaviour, 1(1), 0021. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-016-0021

Saturday, November 19 | 3:30 PM – 5:00 PM

#3: Funding Mechanisms for Behavioral Science Research

 

Saturday, November 19 | 3:30 PM – 5:00 PM

Moderated by:
Daniel W. McNeil, Ph.D.,  Clinical Professor of Dental Public Health & Professional Practice, Eberly College of Arts & Sciences; School of Dentistry, West Virginia University

Panelists:

Melissa Riddle, Ph.D., Chief, Behavioral Social Sciences and Research Branch , National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

Paige A. Green, Ph.D., M.P.H., FABMR, Chief, Basic Biobehavioral and Psychological Sciences Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute

Lisa Onken, Ph.D., Director, Behavior Change & Intervention Program, Division of Behavioral and Social Research National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health

David Clark, DrPH, Chief, Implementation Science Branch, Center for Translation Research & Implementation Science National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Christine M. Hunter, Ph.D., ABPP (CAPT, USPHS), Acting Associate Director for Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, NIH Acting Director, Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, National Institutes of Health

Monica Webb Hooper, Ph.D., Deputy Director of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)

Amanda Chue, Ph.D., Program Officer, Science Operations, Clinical Effectiveness and Decision Science, Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

 

Abstract:

A significant disease burden in the U.S. can be attributed to behavioral factors, yet there is a significant gap in the integration of disease and behavior change research that is imperative to accelerate discovery, translation, and create a broader impact for the public. The NIH has laid out a vision for a unified science of behavior change (see Nielsen, 2018), yet many cognitive and behavioral science researchers are unware of the plethora of relevant funding mechanisms and opportunities available to them beyond the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).

This invited panel will bring together directors, program officers, and representatives from “non-traditional” funders who have a specific behavioral science research portfolio:

  1. The National Institutes of Health (NIH):
    • National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities
    • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Branch
    • Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, Basic Biobehavioral and Psychological Sciences Branch
    • National Institute on Aging, Division of Behavioral and Social Research
    • National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, The Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science
    • Division of Services and Intervention Research, Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology Branch
    • Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research
  1. Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)
    • Clinical Effectiveness and Decision Science Program

The primary goal of this invited panel is to help our members gain knowledge regarding potential funding sources for their work, with a special emphasis on those that our members may be less familiar with. The moderator will facilitate a dialogue amongst the panelists about: goals and priorities of their institute/division/branch, relevant funding priorities and opportunities for behavioral and psychological science researchers, and answer questions from the audience.

 

Long-term Goals:

  1. Although CBT has traditionally been used to impact mental health, CBT principles have the potential to positively impact health outcomes more broadly.
  2. Mechanism focused research is a promising avenue for linking science and practice and there are a number of funding opportunities throughout NIH and beyond to support this research.

 

At the end of this session, the learner will be able to:

  • Describe the mission and funding priorities of at least one NIH or PCORI institute that participant was previously unfamiliar with.
  • List potential funding mechanisms that may be relevant to participant’s behavioral science research.
  • Understand a mechanism-focused approach to behavior change research.

 

Session Outline

  1. Panelists will provide a brief overview of the mission and overall funding priorities of their institute/branch/division, with a special focus on the integration of behavioral science research.
  2. The moderator will pose key open-ended questions with the goal of generating thought provocking dialogue around relevant funding  opportunities for behavioral and psychological science researchers.
  3. Q&A

 

Recommended Readings:

Nielsen, L., et al. (2018). The NIH Science of Behavior Change Program: Transforming the science through a focus on mechanisms of change. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 101, 3-11. DOI: 10.1016/j.brat.2017.07.002

Keller, C., et al. (2021). Future directions of the National Institutes of Health Science of Behavior Change Program. Translational Behavioral Medicine, 11 (9), 1795-1801. https://doi.org/10.1093/tbm/ibab029

Boyack, K. W., Klavans, R., & Börner, K. (2005). Mapping the backbone of science. Scientometrics, 64(3), 351-374. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-005-0255-6

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